The Difference Between Antiques And Collectibles

Everyone likes nice things, and they like to decorate their environment using those nice things. One of the more basic ways people decorate their environment is through antiques and collectibles; while the two terms are usually paired, there are differences between the two that need to be discussed. While there is some overlap, and thus why they are paired, when you are looking for something to decorate your home there are some very real differences that need to be considered when looking for something to decorate your environment.

What Are Antiques?

At the very simplest, antiques are items that have withstood the test of time and have some sort of intrinsic value. That is, the items have some sort of utilitarian feature that gives them some sort of practical value; for example, dishes, a table, or even a hat rack. These items, at least at some point, had some sort of actual function and they were designed with that function in mind. These items have also been around for a long time, usually fifty or more years; the item needs to have demonstrated some level of permanence. That combination of perceived practicality and proven age is what helps to define an antique.

What Are Collectibles?

Collectibles, on the other hand, are more artifacts of popular culture, regardless of when that culture was around. This is where paintings, comic books, and general memorabilia come in; the idea here is that the objects have very limited practical value, with almost all of their value being in the memories that they evoke. Note the “limited practical value”; while plates and glasses have some practical value, for example, most of their value is related to what they mean to someone. This is the difference between Depression glass and collector plates: The former can still be used while the latter has no real practical value beyond whatever they celebrate.

It should be noted that there are some objects that do not fit easily into either category. Some older paintings, for example, are sometimes considered antiques despite the lack of practical purpose due to their cultural value. The difference between antiques and collectibles does create some practical considerations; antiques usually require little maintenance while collectibles must be meticulously cared for. Also, antiques tend to be worth more. However, those differences do not matter to the person looking to use them to decorate with; all that should matter is whether or not they work for your decorating scheme.

Antiques And Collectibles Value For The Collector

You will find many people who will travel hours to be at an antiques and collectibles exhibition. Likewise, some people are willing to pay a premium at auctions and antique sales to purchase one of the unique antique pieces. There are several reasons why antiques and collectibles hold such value for certain people. Many people find these items a great way for them to remember the old times. You will often find collectors who are old and are only looking to collect pieces as some antiques remind them of their childhood days. We have some prominent collectors who hold antiques worth millions of dollars where their only concern is to reflect on the past. Other than that, there are other reasons why people search and spend so much to buy antiques and collectibles.

Emotional Sentiments

Many people find an emotional connection with an antique or collectible. They may find a collection of art, furniture, or other antiques that date back hundreds of years and link to their great ancestors. When collectors learn about these ties, they are willing to pay a premium to get hold of the collectibles.

Market Appraisal

Some want to invest in antiques, as these can bring in huge dividends. Some of the people buy the collectibles and put them on sale online for a reasonable markup. Those who can make substantial investments buy some of the top antique pieces to resale them at auctions or art exhibitions. There’s no capping on the amount of profit you can make when selling antiques as a collector can even pay ten times the value of the item in an auction. The lucrative business prospect is one thing that brings many people on the table to buy these collectibles.

Favorite Antiques

Some people buy antiques before they have a passion for getting hold of something they love. For instance, you can find coin collectors who are always looking to purchase coins dating back hundreds of years. You can find a sports fan who can pay a premium to get an old baseball card. Unlike other collectors for them, buying and holding antiques is the pursuit of their passion for anything they like.

Antiques as Decor

There is no denying the antiques have high aesthetic appeal. So some people buy these to use as decorates for their homes and offices. These people search for paintings, ceramics, stoneware, and other items that they can use to enhance the aesthetic appeal of their homes.

Overall the market for antiques and other collectibles continues to grow.

Why An Essential Oil Bag

What and why would anyone have and Essential Oil Bag?

Well firstly it keeps your essential oils safe and cool and all in order and ready to be used whenever needed.

Most also come with different guides which can help you with your work especially if you are new to the game like:

ESSENTIAL OIL BOOKLET GUIDE: many novices and even some mid-novice can still get it wrong no matter how much you studied or read about essential oils and even though most essential oils are non-toxic or no side effects mixing the wrong one can either cause damage as in rashes or even opposite to what you intended in the first place, so this booklet will make any reflexologist or therapist feel at ease, especially as each case will have a specific guide to that oils contained in that bag.

DILUTION CHARTS: whether you are a novice, semi-novice or professional daily therapist it is always good to have a dilution chart with you as many patients have various problems at once and can have various degrees of a problem and the oils only works indicated and getting it wrong might not kill or harm the patient but could leave you as a therapist a bit embarrassed when nothing works.

UNDERSTANDING YOUR DIFFERENT TYPES OF OILS GUIDE: as per your oil guide, this booklet will also explain the uses of each oil and combinations for whichever problems you might encounter

THE BEST WAYS FOR OIL APPLICATION: even though a novice may know how to do this, this guide is handy to have if a patient queries a certain manner of application and sometimes if in a certain sensitive area.

THE BEST WAYS OF HANDLING ESSENTIAL OILS CHART: As times passes so does your oils if used daily (opening and closing, taking it out, putting it away, the area you work and temperatures exposed to) all these can be double-checked to keep your oils as safe as possible by following this guide.

A QUICK REFERENCE CHART: many times with all your knowledge at hand you might just have seen something on a patient you never knew before the session and a quick recollection using this guide can allow you with confidence to go ahead or stop and have a guide to explain your decision if questioned by the patient.

ESSENTIAL OIL PARTY AND PROMOTION TIPS: as a bonus, some of the bigger Essential Oil Bag packages will have a small booklet to explain how to promote their products in promotion or oil party forms and how to run it successfully.

Clarice Cliff,Hand Painted Bizarre

Clarice Cliff, born 20 January 1899 in Meir Street in a modest terrace house, in Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, to parents Harry Thomas and Ann (née Machin) and died 23 October 1972.

She practiced the artform of ceramic artistry from 1922 to 1963 as a factory head of artistry department.

She attended a different school than her 6 siblings and visited an aunt after school that was a hand painter of pottery in a pottery factory and was quite good at making paper-mâché models in school.

She started assisting her aunt in the factory at the age of 13 by adding the gold lines on traditional pottery ware but soon changed her job to freehand painting after mastering the gilder job.

With this change, she also changed factories and studied art and sculpture at the Burslem School of arts in the evenings.

To improve her career opportunities she made the unusual decision to move to another factory in Newport in 1916.

Most of the women doing this type of work stuck to one artform to maximize their income but Clarice Cliff was very ambitious and started practicing and become skilled in modeling figurines, vases, gilding, outlining enameling (the actual art form of filling in colors within an outline) and banding (which is the painting of radial bands on plates and vessels) while keeping pattern and hand-painting ware books for inspiration.

In 1920 one of her decorating managers brought her to the attention of one of the factory owners that ran the company.

Though being seventeen years her senior, he took an interest in her romantically (even though he was married they became lovers and later ended up marrying each other) as well as in her artistic abilities and nurtured her skills, where she ended up at the Royal College of Art and to Paris, as well as given a second apprenticeship at the factory.

In 1924, at the age only 25, she was not only the primary modeler for the factory but worked with the factory designers, with over 20 years of experience, and produced the conservative styled Victorian Ware.

Given her own studio in 1927, she started her own form of glazing by using on-glaze enamel colors instead of underglazing colors and used triangles in small patterns to cover the small imperfections, in a style which she called “Bizarre” which later became her signature form of work and even started undersigning the items with the signature, “Hand Painted Bizarre by Clarice Cliff, Newport Pottery England.

Even after she passed away in 1972 her popularity in her way of designing pottery and painting remained and in 1982 they even started a club, Original Clarice Cliff Collectors Club, after finding ex work colleagues(known as Bizarre Girls) to fill in the gaps of her work life.

These clubs visited all across England and even to Australia, New Zealand and North America

The History And Evolution Of Wedgwood Jasperware

Wedgwood Jasperware – A Unique Pottery

The pottery is famous as it is one of the decorative that people prefer over the traditional pottery. The invention of this form came from an English potter, Josiah Wedgwood. He was a famous English potter who was pursuing work with different clays and discover a new type of stoneware. He kept his methods secret and was the person who was the lead in the mass-production of the stoneware. It was his vision, endless work, and release of the style in the market that made the product what it is today, and although the modern form of pottery as many variations, it follows the arts of Josiah.

Admiration for Wedgwood Jasperware

There is no doubt that the art piece is strikingly beautiful and makes for a great addition to the interior styling of a home or office space. The style of pottery is also a favorite for most artists as it has a sleek texture and captivating matte finish. The stoneware comes in eye-catching colors, where the most well-liked color is the “Wedgwood blue.” There have been various classifications of the products. However, most of the experts and artists classify the stone as a type of porcelain artwork. According to the experts, the porcelain in the Wedgwood jasperware gives it a fine-grained surface.

The Secret Formula

In his times, Josiah kept the elements he was using to create the artwork a secret. While at those time, it was not easy to find the details, with the advancement in science, the mystery was no longer something other could not figure out.

Modern chemical testing revealed the secret formula was the use of barium sulfate that is one of the key elements to create the jasperware. There are many things the chemical does when setting the pottery. For example, barium enhances the elasticity of the clay. Also, the finish pieces of the jasperware have a sleek look that comes from the application of barium.

Wedgwood Jasperware Today

There has been a slight variation in design and make of the wedgewood jasperware today. The production capacity has increased as the method utilizes electronic pottery manufacturing machines and tools that did not exist back then. There are also some new materials, and the clay has more variation to it with traces of other minerals.

Regardless of these changes, jasperware remains one of the favorite items for collectors and art-lovers all over the world.